Thursday, June 10, 2010

Day 7: Finals, Winners and Awards



FIRST PLACE PRIZE
David Yoshiaki Ko
$10,000



SECOND PLACE PRIZE
Michael Stewart
$5,000



THIRD PLACE PRIZE
Alexander Beyer
$3,000



AUDIENCE COMMUNICATION
David Yoshiaki Ko
$500

JUNIOR JURY PRIZE
Michael Stewart
$300

BEST PERFORMANCE OF A DUO
David Yoshiaki Ko
$500

WINNER'S CHOICE OF MUSIC PUBLISHED BY HAL LEONARD
David Yoshiaki Ko
$1,000

Day 6: Master Classes, Outreach, Rehearsals, and Feghali Recital

Tuesday began at several locations, with Joel Harrison at the Steinway Gallery for a master class with non-competitors, and at the Wilson Center with Andrews Sill and semifinalists working on their concerto. All met in Brookfield at the beautiful mansion of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, who provided a delicious dinner and social hour.

Competitors then went off to various assisted living homes and performed and spoke about their music for the audience. In the afternoon, professionals gave a panel discussion on building a career as a musician in the industry. Shorty after, non-competitors from Mr. McDonald's Sunday master class gave a recital at the Wilson Center.

In the evening, Mr. Jose Feghali gave a refreshing and enriching concert which included works by Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, and Debussy. It was not the thrilling difficulty of the music that made it special, but the sensitivity, the layers of melody, subtle nuance, and insightful playing that left the audience speechless for long periods of time after each piece.

Day 3-5 Solo Recitals, Rehearsals, and Finalists Announced

DAY 3
Saturday was filled with excellent piano recitals featuring a Chopin Nocturne, an etude of their choice, a 20th-century American work after 1940, and another personal selection. While some competitors chose the same works, they offered diverse programs with their own distinctive flair. The order was Yesse Kim, Michael Stewart, David Yoshiaki Ko, Alex Beyer, Tristan Savella, Philip Kwoka, Alison Chiang, John Chen, Kai Talim, Andrew Kim, Benjamin Hopkinson, and Fan-Ya Lin.

DAY 4
Sunday featured rehearsals with the violin or cello duo partners, and rehearsals in the hall with the second pianists for the first movement of their concerto. In the morning, Mr. McDonald gave a master class for 4 non-competitors who are of the same age group as competitors. Those who were not rehearsing or working in the afternoon went to the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra to hear Mahler.

DAY 5
Following another full day of a solo work, duo selection, and first movement of a concerto, the finalists were announced: Alexander Beyer, Michael Stewart, and David Yoshiaki Ko. After competing, everyone went to the Medford's to relax and enjoy a delicious home made dinner by chef Gene Medford.

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Day 2: Rehearsals and Prelude Recital


Sejoon Park gave the competition and festival an inspirational beginning. He began by sympathizing with this year's competitors who probably would rather be practicing than listening. He promised to keep it short. However, the crowd didn't let him....

Not "to cheat the system," Sejoon also spoke about his pieces. He explained that, just as you like to order your food so you know what's in it, it is helpful to know what to expect from a music piece. He began with an "appetizer" - two sonatas by Scarlatti. He wrote over a hundred of these, inspired by his love for a Spanish princess. Sejoon would "just have gotten her a flower every day," but Scarlatti was a musical genius. Just as promised, the music was charming and sweet. His voicing of the lines and harmonic progressions was particularly sweet.

Next, though he "hated to keep making food references," Sejoon served a Spring salad; that is, Schubert's Sonata no. 13 in A major, which always reminds him of Spring. One of the contestants said afterward that he always disliked this piece, until hearing Sejoon's interpretation. The first movement was pleasant and beautiful; the second was peaceful and idyllic, after settling a voicing issue in the opening bars; and the last was lively - not only with energy, but with his timing. It reminded me of the great Josef Lhevinne's statement, "Play the rests!"

As an "afterthought," Sejoon added Schumann's Arabesque in C major - simple and beautiful. In the B section, the listener was cast into a new world; one that was dreamy and lost in thoughts.
Glinka's The Lark was cheerfully songful and sparkling. This was followed with the heavy, serious Rachmaninoff Sonata no. 2 in B-flat minor. Sejoon talked about the serious and sad life of Rachmaninoff, and proceeded to communicate that feeling with his playing. There were spacious reflections and deep emotion, bringing to mind Rachmaninoff's statement that while others write music from their head, he writes from the heart.

The audience couldn't get enough of Sejoon. His first encore was Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody no. 13. Following extended applause, he asked, "Would you like more?" and proceeded to play another exciting show piece with a thunderous technique and resounding approval.

Friday, June 4, 2010

Kai Talim


Kai Talim, age 17, is from Portland, Oregon. His Solo Recital will take place at 3:50 p.m. on Saturday, June 5:

CHOPIN Nocturne no. 13 in C minor, Opus 48, no. 1

SERGE RACHMANINOFF Étude-tableau in A minor, Opus 39, no.6

SAMUEL BARBER Sonata for piano, Opus 26
III. Adagio mesto
IV. Fuga: Allegro con spirito

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 23 in F minor, Opus 57 (“Appassionata”)
I. Allegro assai

~~~~~~~~~~~

His Duo, Concerto, and Solo performance is scheduled to be at 9:55 a.m. on Monday, June 7:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Ballade no. 1 in G minor, Opus 23

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata for violin and piano no. 7 in C minor, Opus 30, no. 2
I. Allegro con brio

ROBERT SCHUMANN Concerto in A minor, Opus 54
I. Allegro affettuoso

~~~~~~~~~~~~

ABOUT KAI

The Talim household is filled with music. Kai Talim might be practicing the piano, or the trumpet. His sister might be practicing the violin. Of course, they have lessons of all those instruments. When Kai takes a practice break, he likes to go outdoors to participate in a variety of sports, especially ultimate frisbee. (He says that he enjoys the constant movement of the players.) Whether he is playing on a sports team or performing in the youth symphony, Kai enjoys collaborating with others. Not surprisingly, he enjoys playing chamber music, as well as concertos, and has performed piano concertos with the Portland Youth Philharmonic, Rose City Chamber Orchestra and the Pacific Crest Sinfonietta.

The piano was Kai’s first instrument, and it is still his primary one. He began piano lessons at age six in Kobe, Japan. Continuing with his studies when he moved to Portland, Oregon, Kai says that when he began to study with Kelli Stephens, his interest in piano developed into a major one. Through the years, he has received support to continue his studies and awards. Kai received a grand piano through the Piano Santa Foundation. He won first place in the Suzanne Raines Young pianist Competition in 208 and with the Oregon Music Teachers Association Junior Piano Competition in 2007.

Kai enjoys playing his instruments for people unable to attend concerts, such as those in retirement residencies or hospitals. When describing what he would like his audience to experience, he uses a word others have used to describe his music, “sincere.”

Michael Stewart


Michael, age 20, is from West Valley City, Utah. His Solo Recital will take place on Saturday, June 5 at 9:10 am:

CHOPIN Nocturne no. 8 in D–flat major, Opus 27, no. 2

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 24 in C minor, Opus 25, no. 12

JOHN MUSTO Improvisation and Fugue

FRANZ LISZT Rhapsodie Espagnole, S. 254

~~~~~~~~~~~~

He will give his Duo, Concerto, and Solo Recital on Monday, June 7 at 6:05 pm:

MAURICE RAVEL Miroirs
IV. Alborada del gracioso
(“The Comedian’s Aubade”)

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata for violin and piano in D major, Opus 12, no. 1
I. Allegro con brio

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Concerto no. 20 in D minor, Köchel 466
I. Allegro

~~~~~~~~~~~~


ABOUT MICHAEL


“I knew from a very early age that music, and especially the piano, would play a pivotal role in my life,” says Michael Stewart. “The piano gives me motivation… it provides an emotional and creative outlet… it has been a good friend…and it has taught me life skills such as being dedicated, patient, perseverant, and goal-oriented.” This has led Michael to excellence in piano and academic performance. He has been on the Dean’s List at the University of Utah since 2007, is a member of three honor societies, was valedictorian of his high school class, and has received several academic awards, including the West Valley City Mayor’s “Star of Excellence” Award.

Highlights of his piano awards include first prizes in the Utah Symphony “Salute to Youth” Auditions, the University of Utah Concerto Competition, Aloha International Piano Competition in Hawaii, and the Coeur d’Alene Symphony National Competition in Idaho. He was also a prizewinner in the Liszt-Garrison International Piano Competition in Maryland, and the Snowy Range Piano Competition in Wyoming.

Michael’s goals are to complete his undergraduate studies and earn a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree that will prepare him to teach as a piano faculty member in collaboration with other faculty, and to research and write about music. He further plans to be actively engaged in improving his community by working on projects with service organizations. Michael is currently studying at the University of Utah with Susan Duehlmeier.


Fan-Ya Lin


Fan-Ya, age 20, is from Ogden, Utah. Her Solo Recital will take place at 6:05 p.m. on Saturday, June 5:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 14 in F-sharp minor, Opus 48, no. 2.

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 18 in G-sharp minor, Opus 25, no. 6

LOWELL LIEBERMANN Gargoyles, Opus 29
I. Presto
II. Adagio semplice, ma con molto rubato
III. Allegro moderato
IV. Presto feroce

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Toccata no. 6 in C minor, BWV 911

~~~~~~~~~~~~

She will perform her Duo, Concerto, and Recital program at 2:45 p.m. on Monday, June 7:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Ballade no. 4 in F minor, Opus 52

JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Concerto no. 23 in A major, Köchel 488
I. Allegro

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ABOUT FAN-YA

Born in Taipei, Taiwan, Fan-Ya Lin began piano study at age four. With great love and passion for music, it is her ultimate goal to become a concert pianist. It is Fan-Ya’s dream to be a pianist who performs around the world, who brings the most uplifting experience to the audience, who shares the pure beauty of great composers' masterworks, and who inspires the listeners beyond the technique and artistry of piano playing.

Through the years, she has won many competitions. The most significant was last March when she placed first in the 2010 Music Teachers National Association Steinway Young Artist National Piano Competition. Winning this award began the prior fall with state rounds. Shet won first place in the 2009 Utah Music Teacher National Association Young Artist Competition, then the South West Division. All competitions were in the senior division and included upper level college and graduate students.

In 2009, Fan-Ya also received other awards that include third place in the Aurora Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, first place in the Utah Music Teacher Association Concerto Competition, third place in the Beethoven Club International Piano Competition, and first place in the Snowy Range Piano Competition,

Among the many music festivals Fan-Ya have attended are the Bowdoin Music Festival, Paris International Summer Session, Aspen Music Festival and Music@Menlo. She has played in the piano master classes given by renowned pianists and master teachers such as Ivo Pogorelich, Boris Berman, Nelita True, Dr. Boris Slutsky, Wu Han, Orli Shaham, Jeffrey Kahane, Gilbert Kalish, Lydia Artymiw, and Menahem Pressler.

In 2008, Fan-Ya was accepted into several prestigious music schools in Taiwan and in the United States. She chose to attend Weber State University, where she is the recipient of the Edna Ione Hall Scholarship, to study with Dr. Yu-Jane Yang.


Philip M. Kwoka


Philip, age 18, is from Wellington, Florida. His Solo Program will take place at 1:15 p.m. on Saturday, June 5:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 8 in D–flat major, Opus 27, no. 2

CLAUDE DEBUSSY Étude no. 11 in A-flat major from Études pour le Piano
("pour les Arpèges composés")

SAMUEL BARBER Sonata for piano, Opus 26
IV. Fuga: Allegro con spirito

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Sonata no. 2 in B Flat major, Op. 35
I. Grave - Doppio movimento
II. Scherzo
III. Marche funèbre: Lento
IV. Finale: Presto

~~~~~~~~~~~~

His Duo, Concerto, and Solo recital will take place at 1:15pm as well, on Monday, June 5:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Andante spianato et Grande Polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Opus 22
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 12
I. Allegro vivace

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Opus 37
I. Allegro con brio

~~~~~~~~~~~~

ABOUT PHIL

A first generation American, Philip Kwoka was born in New York City to Polish parents and grew up speaking both Polish and English. Not surprisingly, Philip is especially fond of compositions by Polish composer Frédéric Chopin – an interest that led him to receiving yearly scholarships in 2007 and 2008 from the Chopin Foundation of the United States.

When Philip was in elementary school, his family moved to South Florida, where he began piano studies with Roberta Rust at the Lynn University Preparatory School of Music. After graduating from high school, he was accepted at the Cleveland Institute of Music, where he is currently studying with Daniel Shapiro.

Philip says that he has an enormous passion for and “an insatiable desire to expand my knowledge of music.” His passion, studies, and disciplined efforts were rewarded in 2007, when he won first place prizes with the Tampa Bay Symphony Young Artist Competition and the Bradshaw and Buono International Piano Competition. In 2008, he was also a prizewinner with the New World Symphony Concerto Competition and the Blount Slawson Young Artist Competition. .

Philip likes challenges. He has learned six concertos, has a very large repertory, and looks forward to the challenges of the PianoArts competition that includes solo and chamber music, as well as audience engagement that integrates speaking about the music and performing. When he is not practicing or studying piano repertory, he listens to a vast array of symphonic and chamber music. He also enjoys Florida lifestyle activities of skateboarding, surfing, tennis, and golf.

Tristan Savella

Tristan, age 18, is from Ithaca, New York. On his Solo Recital, at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 5, he will perform:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 17 in B major,
Opus 62, no. 1

SERGE RACHMANINOFF Étude-tableau in D major,
Opus 39, no. 9

ROBERT MUCZYNSKI Toccata, Opus 15

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 30 in E major,
Opus 109
I. Vivace, ma non troppo. Adagio espressivo
II. Prestissimo
III. Andante molto cantaile ed espressivo

~~~~~~~~~~~~

For the Duo, Concerto, and Solo program, he will play at 2:00 p.m. on Monday, June 7:

MAURICE RAVEL Le Tombeau de Couperin
I. Prelude
IV. Rigaudon

JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for cello and piano in E minor, Opus 38
I. Allegro non troppo

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Concerto No. 1 in C major, Opus 15
I. Allegro con brio

~~~~~~~~~~~~


ABOUT TRISTAN

Now a student at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, Tristan Savella’s life has been a musical journey beginning in Ithaca, New York, where he was born, then to the Philippines, where he started piano lessons at the Yamaha School of Music. Returning to Ithaca when he was eight, he continued his piano studies and, in time, transferred to Miri Yampolsky at Cornell University. When he was thirteen, Tristan was accepted as a boarding student in Michigan’s Interlochen Arts Academy.

His journey has included performing in Weill Recital Hall in New York City’s Carnegie Hall after winning first place in the 2008 Bradshaw and Buono International Piano Competition. In 2009, Tristan performed at the University of Miami as a finalist in National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts YoungARTS, a competition that usually has six to eight thousand applicants performing in nine different art forms. He was also a prizewinner in the 2007 Michigan Music Teachers Association Concerto Competition.

Tristan has performed in master classes and studied with teachers from several different schools of music. During the past three years, he has studied with Phiroze Mehta at Ithaca College and Thomas Lymenstull at Interlochen Arts Academy. He is currently a student of Nelita True.





David Yoshiaki Ko


David, age 17, is from Millbrae, California. His Solo Program will be performed at 9:55 a.m. on Saturday, June 5

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 5 in F–sharp major, Opus 15, no. 2

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 1 in C major, Opus 10, no. 1

ROBERT MUCZYNSKI Desperate Measures in A minor, Opus 48 (“Paganini variations”)

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 11 in B-flat major, Opus 22
I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio con molta espressione
III. Menuetto
IV. Rondo: Allegretto

~~~~~~~~~~~

His Duo, Concerto, and Solo recital will be given Monday, June 7 at 5:20 pm:

ROBERT SCHUMANN Sonata no. 2 in G minor, Opus 22
I. Vivacissimo: So rasch wie möglich
II. Andantino: Gretragen
III. Scherzo: Sehr rasch und markiert
IV. Rondo: Presto

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata for violin and piano no. 7 in C minor, Opus 30, no. 2
I. Allegro con brio

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Concerto no. 2 in F minor, Opus 21
1. Maestoso

~~~~~~~~~~~~

ABOUT DAVID

Music is an “integral part of my identity,” says David Yoshiaki Ko. His musical life began at four, in Japan, when David convinced his mother to accompany him to a piano studio where he could take piano lessons. When he was eight, and living with his family in San Francisco, David continued his piano studies at the San Francisco Conservatory, where he also took cello and composition lessons.

After graduating from high school at sixteen, David attended a summer master class at the Universität Mozarteum in Salzburg. While there, he was invited by Professor Karl-Heinz Kämmerling to study with him at the Hanover State University of Music and Drama. Now seventeen, David spends several months of the year going back and forth between Germany and America.

In 2007 and 2008, David received scholarships from the Chopin Foundation of the United States. He also won first place prizes at both the Pacific Musical Society Competition in San Francisco and the Marilyn Mindell Piano Competition at Stanford University. In Germany, he was a prizewinner at Lindau’s Rotary Jugend-Musikpris.

One of the reasons David chose to participate in the PianoArts competition is the diversity of the competition rounds that include solo, chamber music, concerto repertory, as well as speaking about music. He wants to change the impression that classical music is dry and pretentious by helping audiences to experience the emotions and thoughts of the composer. David is able to see the impact of these kinds of programs when he performs outreach programs, such as performances in retirement residences and in 2008, participating in the Peninsula Symphony’s program for children in grades four and five in the San Francisco Bay area.


Yesse Kim


Yesse, age 17, is from Ann Arbor, Michigan. Her Solo Recital can be heard at 8:25 a.m. on Saturday, June 5:

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 13 in C minor, Opus 48, no. 1

FRANZ LISZT Two Études de concert no. 2, Searle 145
Gnomenreigen (“Dance of the Gnomes”)

SAMUEL BARBER Sonata, Opus 26
IV. Fuga: Allegro con spirito

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Sonata no. 2 in B-flat minor, Opus 35
I. Grave - Doppio movimento
II. Scherzo
III. Marche funèbre: Lento
IV. Finale: Presto

~~~~~~~~~~~~

She will perform her Duo, Concerto, and Solo recital on Monday, June 7 at 12:30 pm:

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN Sonata in C major, Hoboken XVI: 48
I. Andante con espressione
II. Rondo (Presto)


JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile


FELIX MENDELSSOHN Concerto no. 1 in G minor, Opus 25
1. Molto allegro con fuoco

~~~~~~~~~~~~


ABOUT YESSE

In a recent interview, Yesse Kim described her personality through reflections by her friends: fun loving, yet disciplined; emotional yet serious. Yesse, herself, says that she is “rational yet spontaneous.” When asked what she would like the audience to hear in her music, she said, “…passion, enjoyment, and maturity.”

Reflecting her personality, Yesse’s performances have been enjoyed in Korea, China and many parts of the United States. Many were award-winning concerts. She was a recent winner in 2010 Dearborn Symphony Young Artists Auditions, performing Felix Mendelssohn’s Concerto Piano no. 1 in G minor with the orchestra. Also in 2010, Yesse was a prizewinner in Chicago’s Sejong Piano Competition.

After moving from Korea to Michigan in 2006, Yesse was the winner in the Yamaha Music Teachers National Association in Michigan and the Michigan Music Teachers Association Concerto. She was also a prizewinner in the Kingsville International Piano Competition. She made her orchestral debut at the age of nine with the Daejeon Sangrok Orchestra in Korea and later performed with the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra. In 2004 and 2005, she traveled to China to perform as a part of the Korea-China Exchange Concert of Piano Prodigies.

In addition to performing wit the Dearborn Symphony Orchestra, Yesse was a featured soloist with the Ann Arbor and Birmingham-Bloomfield symphonies. Yesse began her piano studies and the age of six and is currently a student of Panayis Lyras, who teaches at Michigan State University.

When Yesse is not listening to and performing the piano, she listens to jazz and lots of cello pieces, especially those composed by Astor Piazzola, Peter Tchaikovsky and Serge Rachmaninoff.

Andrew B. Kim

Andrew, age 20, is from Los Angeles, California. His Solo Recital will be performed at 4:35 p.m. on Saturday, June 5:


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 17 in B major, Opus 62, no. 1


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 1 in C major, Opus 10, no. 1


SAMUEL BARBER Souvenirs, Opus 28
I. Waltz (“The lobby”)
III. Pas de Deux
(“A corner of the ballroom”)


FRANZ LISZT Aprés une Lecture de Dante:
Fantasia quasi sonata, S. 161


~~~~~~~~~~~~


Andrew's second performance of a Duo, Concerto, and Solo, can be seen on Monday, June 7 at 3:50 pm:


JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH/Busoni Transcription of Chaconne for solo violin from
Partita no. 2 in D minor, KiV B24


FRANZ SCHUBERT Sonatina no. 2 for violin and piano in A minor,
Deutsch 385, (Opus posthumous 137, no. 2)
I. Allegro moderato


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Concerto no. 2 in B–flat major, Opus 19
I. Allegro con brio


~~~~~~~~~~~~


ABOUT ANDREW

Listening to recordings of mezzo-soprano, Dame Janet Baker; cellist, Jacqueline du Pre; and violinist, Gidon Kremer inspired Andrew Kim to pursue a career as a concert pianist. When he was three years old, he began piano lessons. (Then he did not enjoy practicing.) As he matured and listened to performances by great artists, he discovered that music was a permanent part of his life.

Andrew says that painters, such as Marc Chagall, have also helped him to understand the beauty in a work of art. Through his piano performance, Andrew strives to create a work of art that is much like the painting The Taking of Christ by the Italian Baroque master, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. Andrews illuminates his thoughts by saying that the painting shows great technical facility, without showing off, and has an emotional, philosophical, intellectual, and religious depth.

In addition to music in the piano repertory, Andrew enjoys the works of Johann Sebastian Bach, symphonies by Gustav Mahler, César Franck, Carl Nielson, and Serge Prokofiev, as well as Kindertotenlieder and Lieder Eines Fahrenden Gesellen by Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht, and string quartets by Dmitri Shostakovich.

What would Andrew like the audience to hear in his music? He responds, “The emotional depth, intelligence, and the cleanliness of my performance.” Andrew won the Sophia Guzik Foundation Scholarship Award at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he studies with Vitaly Margulis.

Benjamin Hopkins


Benjamin, age 20, is from Rochester, New York. His Solo Recital will take place Saturday, June 5 at 5:20 pm:


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 8 in D–flat major, Opus 27, no. 2


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 2 in A minor, Opus 10, no. 2


LOWELL LIEBERMANN Gargoyles, Opus 29
IV. Presto feroce


JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Partita no. 2 in C Minor, BWV 826
I. Sinfonia: Grave adagio – Andante
II. Allemande
III. Courante
IV. Sarabande
V. Rondeaux
VI. Capriccio

~~~~~~~~~~~~~


His Duo, Concerto, and Solo program will be performed at 10:40 a.m. on Monday, June 7:


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Ballade no. 4 in F minor, Opus 52


JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Concerto No. 1 in C major, Opus 15
I. Allegro con brio


~~~~~~~~~~~~


ABOUT BENJAMIN


Speaking about audiences at his performances, Benjamin Hopkins says that his goal is for the audience to hear something that opens their ears and hearts and gives them “a new and unforgettable experience.” That is an experience that Ben has on a regular basis as an avid concertgoer himself.

Now living in Los Angeles, Ben takes every opportunity to hear world-class performers in concert and opera. He says that these experiences have been “invaluable in shaping my broader musical understanding and feeling for style.” He loves the symphonies by Ludwig van Beethoven, especially Symphony no. 7. in A major, Opus 92, and is a huge opera fan. Ben also enjoys jazz; one of his favorite pianists is Keith Jarrett.

A highlight of Ben’s performing experience was the opportunity to play Edvard Grieg’s Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus 16 with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. The Rochester Philharmonic League Young Artist Auditions presented him in this performance after he won their 2008 Special Award and Ness Award. Also in 2008, Ben won the first place prize in Rochester’s Hochstein School of Music and Dance Recital Competition. In 2007, he won first place prize in New York State’s 1000 Islands International Piano Competition.

A native of Rochester, Ben studies with Norman Krieger at the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California. When he can, Ben enjoys performing for diverse audiences, especially those still in high school. He believes strongly in reaching out to new audiences.

Alison Chiang

Alison, age 18, is from Plano, Texas. Her Solo Recital will be presented Saturday, June 5 at 2:00 p.m.

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 1 in B–flat minor, Opus 9, no. 1

FRANZ LISZT Grandes études de Paganini
Étude no. 2 in E-flat major, Searle 140

ALEXINA LOUIE Scenes from a Jade Terrace
I. Warriors

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 18 in E-flat major, Opus 31, no. 3
I. Allegro
II. Allegro vivace
III. Moderato e grazioso
IV. Presto con fuoco

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Her Duo, Concerto, and Solo program can be heard on Monday, June 7 at 8:25 am.

HENRI DUTILLEUX Sonata pour piano
III. Chorale et variations

JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Concerto no. 2 in F minor, Opus 21
1. Maestoso

~~~~~~~~~~~~

ABOUT ALISON

With each of her family’s moves, Alison Chiang discovered new opportunities as a student and performer of the piano. She was born in Rochester, New York, where she began her studies at the age of five. Only two years later, she won first place in the Saint Charles Illinois State Music Competition. When Alison was eight, her family moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where she continued her studies at the Cleveland Institute of Music with Olga Radosavljevich, receiving the Olga Radosavljevich scholarship award. At age thirteen, Alison performed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto no. 21 in C major with the Lakeside Symphony. Two years later, Alison performed Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Concerto no. 2 in B-flat major with the Cleveland Women’s Orchestra and the Lakeside Symphony. Robert Cronquist conducted all performances.

In 2007, Alison and her family moved to Plano, Texas, where Alison now studies with Pamela Mia Paul at the University of North Texas. In 2008, Alison won the grand prize in the Vernell Gregg Young Artists’ Competition and performed Camille Saint-Saëns’ Piano Concerto no. 2 in G minor with the Lewisville Lake Symphony. In 2009, she won the Collin County Young Artist Competition and performed Frédéric Chopin’s Piano Concerto no. 2 in F minor with the Plano Symphony Orchestra.

Alison looks forward to the challenging PianoArts competition that requires a full solo recital, duo performances, and a concerto. What does she want the audience to hear in her performances? Alison says that she hopes that the audience will remember the different tone colors and expressions in each piece of music.

When she is not listening to piano music, Alison enjoys violin concertos and symphonies by Ludwig van Beethoven and Peter Tchaikovsky, as well as Modest Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition.

John Chen




John Chen, age 16, is from Lovettsville, Virginia. His Solo program will be performed Saturday, June 5 at 2:45:

(Note to reader: the writing "John Chen #1" is only a number label for the order he sent pictures!)

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 7 in C-sharp minor, Opus 27, no. 1

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Étude no. 23 in A minor, Opus 25, no. 11

ELLIOT CARTER Caténaires

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata in B-flat major, Opus 106, “Hammerklavier”
I. Allegro
IV. Largo – Allegro risoluto

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John will perform his Duo, Concerto, and Solo program Monday at 4:35 p.m.

FRANZ LISZT Reminiscences de Don Juan, S.418

JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Concerto no. 2 in F minor, Opus 21
1. Maestoso

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ABOUT JOHN

When he was five, John Chen moved from Beijing, China, to the United States. He discovered a new country and new love – playing the piano. His life has not been the same since. Today he is a high school junior in Virginia, a Jack Kent Cooke Young Scholar, and a student at The Juilliard School’s Pre-College Division where he studies with Matti Raekallio. But John’s life has had challenges, too. One was finding a place to live where he could play the piano over eight hours each day.

Moving to a location where he could practice, he began to “play music for the world to enjoy.” By age eleven, he won the grand prize in the World Piano Competition. By twelve, he had performed in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall five times. He won first prize in Northern Virginia Music Teachers Association Concerto Competition and performed Camille Saint-Saëns’ Piano Concerto no. 2 in G minor with the World Festival Orchestra in Cincinnati. At thirteen, he performed Peter Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto no. 1 in B-flat minor in Russia’s State Glinka Capella Concert Hall with the Saint Petersburg Orchestra. After winning a concerto competition in The Juilliard School’s Pre-College Division, John performed Franz Liszt’s Piano Concerto no. 1 in E-flat major with the Pre-College Orchestra at Lincoln Center. Last February, John won first prize in the National Symphony Orchestra’s Young Soloist Competition. In July, he will once again perform Tchaikovsky’s piano concerto, this time with the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D. C.

John still finds time to play at the Northern Virginia Sunrise Assisted Living residence and to give benefit concerts for Leesburg’s Loudoun Country Day School to provide scholarships for students of talent from diverse backgrounds.

What does he do in his spare time? John likes to read about everything, ride his bike, watch movies, and listen to operas, symphonies, and sound tracks of movie music. He says that one of the reasons he is participating in the PianoArts competition is because “it measures an all rounded musician instead of a playing machine.”

Alexander P. Beyer


Alex, age 15, is from Fairfield, Connecticut. He will present his solo program Saturday, June 5 at 10:40 a.m.:


FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN Nocturne no. 18 in E major, Opus 62, no. 2


SERGE RACHMANINOFF Étude-tableau in D major,

Opus 39, no. 9


JOHN ALAN ROSE Sleepy Hollow Suite
I. Ichabod and Katrina
II. Van Tassel’s Party
III. Ichabod and the Horseman


MAURICE RAVEL Gaspard de la nuit
I. Ondine
II. Le Gibet
III. Scarbo


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His Duo, Concerto, and Solo program will take place at 9:10 a.m. on Monday, June 7:


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 21 in C major, Opus 53 (“Waldstein”)
I. Allegro con brio
II. Introduzione. Adagio molto – attacca
III. Rondo. Allegretto moderato – Prestissimo


JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A major, Opus 100
I. Allegro amabile


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Concerto no. 3 in C minor, Opus 37
I. Allegro con brio


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ABOUT ALEX


When Alexander Beyer performed Peter Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto no. 1 in B-flat major with the Greater Bridgeport Symphony in Klein Auditorium last November, the Connecticut Post wrote, “Beyer brought great vitality to this Tchaikovsky composition. If the energy was translated into kilowatt hours, the Klein would have enough electricity to light the stage for the rest of the season.” Alex is passionate about his music and believes that his interests outside music have helped him to become a better musician. He believes that playing sports on a competitive level, such as soccer and tennis, teaches discipline and the physical effort helps his endurance.


With so many interests, Alex has learned to be an efficient worker. He has won several solo and concerto competitions, and has performed with the New Haven and Hartford symphony orchestras, as well as the Stamford Youth Philharmonic. He also plays a in a trio and enjoys attending chamber music concerts.

Alex is in the tenth grade and has been studying piano for nine years. His teacher is Yoshie Akimoto in Wilton, Connecticut. Both in 2009 and 2010, he was the top prizewinner in the Music Teachers National Association Eastern Division.


“I am very excited for the future no matter where it takes me,” he says. Although Alex sometimes dreams of becoming an astrophysicist, “I love performing music so much. It’s a chance for me to impact the audience emotionally. And when you think about it, that’s a pretty ambitious goal within itself.”

Day 1: Orientation and Chamber Music

One day about 16 years ago, Stefanie Jacob casually wondered out loud to Sue Medford as they left an excellent performance by a young pianist, "Why doesn't Milwaukee have a professional-level competition for young pianists?" Sue replied seriously, "Why don't we start one?" Since then, PianoArts has evolved into one of the highest-level competitions for pianists, ages 15-20, in the world. Not only do the monumental expectations of repertoire and the level of excellence give this competition distinction; it is the professional guidance during and the festival that lasts long after the competition is over. At the welcome yesterday, Sue pointed out that PianoArts has 12 Semifinalists that are working with 16 professional artists, besides the numerous volunteers and host-families. The emphasis of PianoArts is to build complete, musical artists. As she said, the expectations are so high because "the concerto is a 3-movement art form," and because collaboration is something a pianist will do throughout his or her life, and because speaking knowledgeably about music to diverse audiences is necessary in the 21st century in order to maintain an audience. And this well-rounded sense of preparation goes further. Dancer and instructor Jane Pink will be working with each contestant about how to physically present themselves professionally and with ease on stage, not just at the piano. Wisconsin Conservatory's resident Prometheus Trio then offered some pointers on how to deal with other musicians. Pianist Stefanie Jacob and her husband, cellist Scott Tisdel, performed two movements of a Bach Sonata, then proceeded to discuss trill execution, balance, cues, and adjusting to tempo. Finally, the Prometheus Trio treated the audience with a movement of Shostakovic's first Trio, Op. 8 and the first movement of Mendelssohn D minor, Op. 49. Shockingly, Shostakovic composed his trio when only 17 years old. As Ms. Jacob put it, "It's much better than one would expect from a 17 year old." Yet, what could be more fitting at this competition than a work which is exceedingly more advanced than one would expect? She went on to demonstrate the main themes, built around ominous half-step movement, which builds to multiple exciting climaxes. It seemed to take into the Development section for the players to lock into each other's energy, which stood out especially in the Coda. As Jacob said afterward, the trio would usually end a concer with a big finish such as that one. But they were only warming up for the Mendelssohn trio - AKA "concerto with tiny orchestra." I even heard other orchestral instruments this time that I had never heard before, such as the trumpet (or maybe it was that cell phone back a few rows). They began intimately, with gravity. Throughout, the trio was well attuned to each member, maintaining a well-balanced sound and joining together for a compelling finish.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Press Release

PianoArts 2010 North American Piano Competition

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Milwaukee, Wisconsin - May 17, 2010

Contact: Sue Medford, 414.962.3055

Info@PianoArts.org www.PianoArts.org

Twelve extraordinary young pianists from across the U. S. have been selected through a rigorous screening process to compete for over $20,000 in prizes, scholarships, fellowships, and performance opportunities in PianoArts’ biennial international piano competition and festival at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music, 1584 North Prospect Avenue, and Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts, 19805 West Capitol Drive, June 3-9.

This year’s competition for pianists, ages 15-20, includes a music festival featuring master classes and a recital by the judges, a recital by 2008 winner Sejoon Park, and special performances by the twelve semifinalists selected to compete this year. Tickets range from $10 to $30 and can be purchased by calling 414-962-3055 (or 262-781-9520 for Wilson Center events). For discounted Festival Tickets (students $52 and adults $80), phone 414-962-3055.

Events will open with a recital at the Wisconsin Conservatory by Sejoon Park on June 4 at 7:30 p.m. On June 5 and 7, from 8:15 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., semifinalists will perform solo and collaborative recitals with Milwaukee Symphony musicians at the Conservatory before audiences and a distinguished panel of three judges: José Feghali, Joel Harrison and Robert McDonald. After listening to each contestant perform for almost 1-½ hours, the judges will select three to perform full concertos with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and PianoArts Music Director Andrews Sill on June 9 at 7:30 p.m. for the Finals & Awards Concert at Brookfield’s Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts.

The solo and duo programs, as well as the concertos performed by each of the semifinalists, are posted on the PianoArts Web site. Running coverage of the competition can be followed at www.pianoarts.blogspot.com.

New in 2010:

• Recital, José Feghali, 2010 judge

• Non-competitive master classes by the judges for auditioned young musicians

• Master class recital by participating young musicians

• Panel discussions: “Careers in Music” and “Working with Managers and Presenters”

• “Concerto Conversations” with Stephen Basson, prior to the Finals & Awards Concert

• Community concerts performed by the semifinalists

• “Junior Jury,” a panel of young musicians who select their own 2010 winner

Prizes totaling over $20,000 will be formally presented during the Awards Ceremony, including First, Second, and Third Place Prizes; Audience Communication Award; Best Performance of a Violin or Cello/Piano Duo; scholarship to the International Keyboard Institute and Festival at Mannes College of Music in New York City; Fellowships toperform for diverse Milwaukee audiences; concert performances, including a Debut Recital at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts; and the Junior Jury Prize.

The competition began in March with candidates from seven countries and states coast to coast performing the Preliminary Round on DVD. Judges were Dr. Eun-Joo Kwak, Cardinal Stritch University; Dr. Christos Tsitsaros, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign; and Dr. Jeannie Yu. The non-voting chair was Dr. Margaret Otwell.

PianoArts is committed to providing professional growth for all competitors. Every contestant receives one-on-one comments about their performances from the judges at all competition levels. Semifinalists and finalists attend concerto master classes and have private sessions with professionals on topics such as “Speaking to Audiences about Music.” All rehearse with Music Director Andrews Sill, and their collaborating pianists, violinists and cellists in advance of their public competition performances.

Pianists Advanced to the Semifinals are:

Alexander Beyer

Age 15

Fairfield, Connecticut
(Warde High School)

John Chen

Age 16

Lovettsville, Virginia
(Notre Dame Academy

The Juilliard Pre-College Division)

Alison Chiang

Age 18,

Plano Texas
(Plano West Senior High School)


Benjamin Hopkins

Age 20

Rochester, New York;

(University of Southern California,

Thornton School of Music)

Andrew Kim

Age 20

Los Angeles, California

(University of California at Los Angeles)

Yesse Kim

Age 17

Ann Arbor, Michigan
(Pioneer High School)


David Yoshiaki Ko

Age 17

Millbrae, California

(Hannover University for Music & Dance, Hannover, Germany)


Philip Kwoka

Age 18

Wellington, Florida
(Cleveland Institute of Music)


Fan-Ya Lin

Age 20

Taipei, Taiwan and Ogden, Utah

(Weber State University)


Tristan Savella

Age 18

Ithaca, New York
(Eastman School of Music)

Michael Stewart

Age 20

West Valley City,Utah

(University of Utah)

Kai Talim

Age 17

Portland, Oregon

Sunet High School

About PianoArts

The mission of PianoArts is to develop innovative ways to foster appreciation and performance of classical music by identifying and training a new generation of pianists with exceptional musical and verbal communication skills and by presenting them to diverse audiences.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Pianist Sejoon Park


PRELUDE RECITAL
Friday, June 4
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music
7:30 pm
Adults $15; Students $10

Sejoon Park, 2008 winner, sets the standard for the competition to follow. His program includes works by Robert Schumann, Domenico Scarlatti, and Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Speaking about himself, Sejoon says, "I am a normal teenager who happens to be in love with music.... to feel the connection between myself and the audience is extremely rewarding”… something Sejoon Park tries to achieve everyday. When Sejoon is not performing or listening to piano music, he enjoys being with his friends, participating in athletics and listening to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart operas, Dimitri Shostakovich symphonies and Peter Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto. But when he was a young student in Seoul, Korea, he was not excited about taking piano lessons. Later on he experienced the joy of expressing himself at the piano and became “addicted to music.”

Sejoon was eleven when he moved to the United States to live with his aunt and to study at the Levin School of Music. When he arrived, he could not speak English. Today, he is an honor student, graduate of McLean High School and college sophomore. Sejoon attends the Peabody Conservatory of Music at Johns Hopkins University, where he studies with Boris Slutsky

In 2007 Sejoon won first prize in the Aspen Music Festival Piano Concerto and performed Edward Grieg’s Piano Concerto with the Orchestra of the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. In 2006 he won first Prize in the Southeastern Piano Concerto Competition and performed the Grieg’s concerto with the South Carolina Philharmonic. Other awards include first prizes in the Marlin-Engel and the Cogen Concerto Competitions, both sponsored by the Levine School of Music in Washington D. C., and first prize at the Alexandria Performing Art Association Competition, second prize in the Oberlin International Piano Competition, second prize in the PianoArts 2005 National Competition and third prize in the Eastman Music School International Piano Competition. Sejoon was selected for the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Young Artist Award, which carries a generous scholarship and the opportunity to appear on the well-known "From the Top" radio show.

PIANOARTS AWARDS:
2008 First Place Prize

2006 Scholarship to the International Keyboard Institute and Festival at Mannes College of Music in New York City

2006 Best Performance of a Duo

Friday, May 21, 2010

Schedule of Events

PRELUDE RECITAL
Friday, June 4
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music
7:30 pm
Adults $15; Students $10

Sejoon Park, 2008 winner, sets the standard for the competition to follow. His program includes works by Robert Schumann, Domenico Scarlatti, and Sergei Rachmaninoff.

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SEMIFINAL SOLO RECITALS
Saturday, June 5
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music
45-minute recitals 8:15 am - 7:00 pm
General admission all-day pass $15

Semifinalists discuss their music and perform a virtuoso etude, any Frederic Chopin nocturne, a North American composition written after 1940, and a solo of their choice.

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MASTER CLASSES BY MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Sunday, June 6
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music
10:30am
Auditors $15

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SEMIFINAL DUO RECITALS
Monday, June 7
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music
8:15 am - 7:00 pm
General all-day pass $15

Semifinalists perform duos with a violinist or cellist from the Milwaukee Symphony and the first movement of concertos with a second pianist.

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CONCERTO MASTER CLASS
Tuesday, June 8
Sharon Lynn Wilson Center for the Arts
9:30 am
Auditors $15

Semifinalists, Music Director Andrews Sill, pianist Stefanie Jacob, and MSO musicians explore the concerto art form.

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VAN CLIBURN GOLD MEDAL WINNER'S RECITAL
José Feghali, piano
Tuesday, June 8
Sharon Lynn Wilson Center for the Arts
7:00 pm
Adults $25 & $21; Students $10

World-renowned pianist and Gold Medal Winner of the Seventh Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Mr. Feghali performed with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, recorded for KOSS Classics, and returns to Milwaukee as a PianoArts judge and soloist.

Free! with paid admission to the Van Cliburn Gold Medal Winner's Recital:
3:30 pm - "Careers in Music" and "Working with Managers and Presenters" panel discussions with music professionals
5:00 pm - Master Class performances by participants in the Music Festival

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FINALS & AWARDS CONCERT
Wednesday, June 9
Sharon Lynn Wilson Center for the Arts
7:30 pm
Adults $30 & $21; Students $15

Finalists perform complete concertos with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and PianoArts Music Director Andrews Sill. Don't miss this grand finale and see the beginnings of what may be significant professional careers.

Free! with paid admission to the Finals & Awards Concert:
5:00 pm - "Piano Promenades" - Semifinalists perform favorite piano solos prior to the Finals & Awards Concert.
6:30 pm - "Concerto Conversations" with Stephen Basson gives a preview of the concertos performed during the Finals

Box suppers: $7.95. Phone Becca or Julie at 262.781.1789.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Meet the Judges: José Feghali


José Feghali burst upon the music world in 1985 when he won the Gold Medal in the Seventh Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Ten days later, he performed his United States recital debut to a sold-out hall in Pasadena, California. Today, he is a celebrated artist who has performed over 800 concerts worldwide with renowned orchestras such as the Berlin Philharmonic, Gewandhaus, Royal Concertgebouw, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Royal Philharmonic, London Symphony, Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, BBC Philharmonic, Warsaw Philharmonic and, in the U. S. with the Chicago, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Houston, Dallas, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Atlanta, Baltimore, National, Jacksonville and Nashville symphony orchestras. He has collaborated with eminent conductors, such as Kurt Masur, Neeme Järvi, John Nelson, James DePriest, Yuri Temirkanov, Leonard Slatkin, Kurt Sanderling, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Christoph Eschenbach, Eduardo Mata, Sergiu Comissiona, Philippe Entremont, Andrew Litton, Zdenek Macal, Hans Graf, David Zinman and Hans Vonk.

Among his recitals on prestigious stages in the United States are those at Carnegie Hall, Kennedy Center, and in major halls in Los Angeles and Chicago, where the press hailed him as a pianist “whose gift is musicianship on the most rarefied level.” Others include the Kravis and Meyerson Symphony centers, and performances on the Cliburn Concert series and Ravinia Festival.

His extensive worldwide engagements include the United Kingdom, Germany, Holland, Spain, Portugal, Eastern Europe, Canada, Hong Kong, Singapore and Latin America. As a chamber musician, Mr. Feghali has collaborated with the renowned flutist James Galway, cellists Truls Mørk, Antonio Meneses and Daniel Gaisford, violinists Régis Pasquier, Olivier Charlier and Emanuel Borok, duo piano with André Watts, and performances of Richard Strauss’ Enoch Arden with tenor Jon Vickers. Mr. Feghali is an Artist/Faculty member and Associate Director of the Mimir Chamber Music Festival in Fort Worth, and a regular performer at the “Classical Action/Performing Artists Against Aids” benefit concerts.

Born in Brazil, Mr. Feghali gave his first public performance at age five and appeared with the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra when he was eight. When he was fifteen, he moved to London to study with Maria Curcio Diamond and later was a scholarship student at the Royal Academy of Music with Christopher Elton.

Recordings by Mr. Feghali include a compact disc of music inspired by dance for Koss Classics and his live recording from the Van Cliburn Competition on the VAI label. Recent recordings include an all–Schumann program and an all–Brahms program with cellist Daniel Gasiform on the Anacapa Music label. For Naxos, Mr. Feghali, a major advocate of Brazilian music, recorded Heitor Villa-Lobos’ Bachianas brasileria no. 3 for Piano and Orchestra with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra and conductor Kenneth Schermerhorn.

Mr. Feghali has a special interest in recording technology and is the producer and re-mastering engineer for the retrospective set of nine compact discs for Video Artists International and VAI Audio featuring the live performances of past medalists in the Van Cliburn Competitions. He is Artist–in–Residence at Texas Christian University and serves as Vice President and Executive Director for the new Anacapa Music label.

José Feghali Web site